Hupa Online Dictionary and Texts



Xaxo:wilwatL (Dug-from-the-ground)*
*The first part was told by Oscar Brown, a half-breed, about 30 years of age whose mother belonged to TakimiLding. The story was finished by James Anderson, a man about 55 years old, a native of Medilding.

ya[']dehłts'e:
They were living
ch'in
they say
k'inchiwhi-q'it
Kintcu:hwikut
xokya:y
her grand daughter
hił
both.

An old woman was living with her granddaughter, a virgin, at Kintcu:whwhikut.

hay-'ung'
And
hay
the
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden
yineh-taw
bulbs
xa[']k'iwhe:
to dig
na[:]'iya'
used to go.
hay-'ung'
And
hay
the
xochwo:
grandmother
'a:yxołde:ne'
used to tell her,
nahx-t'a:n
"Two-stalked ones
do: xa'awh
one doesn't dig."

The girl used to go to dig roots and her grandmother used to say to her "You must not dig those with two stalks."

hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
After a time
'a:ch'ondehsne'
she thought,
daydi-gya'awh-ung'
"For what reason
'a:whił-ch'ine:
does she always tell me,
do: xa'awh
'One mustn't dig it.'"

The girl wondered why she was always told that.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
ła'
one
xutł'e'-dung'
morning
'a:ch'ondehsne'
she thought,
xa:y'un-te:
"I will take one out."
haya:ł
And
q'ut
ch'itehsyay
she went.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
na[']ningyay-e:
she crossed over
ch'e'indiqot'-ding
to Tceindi:qo:tding.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
xa[']k'iwingxwe'
she went to digging.

One morning she thought, "I am going to dig one," so she went across the river to Tceindi:qo:tding and began digging.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ch'ondehsne'
she thought,
xa:wh'awh
"I am going to take it out."

She thought, "I am going to take out one with a double stalk."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
xa[']wing'a:n
she had taken it out
mił
then
'ungya'
she heard
mije'e:din
a baby
ky'a:tehłchweh
cry.

When she had dug it out she heard a baby cry.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
dahna[']diwilła:t
she ran
to:-ding
to the river.
ch'e:na'ilła:t
She came there
mił
then
xoq'eh-ts'iw
after her she heard
ky'a:tiwilchwe:l
crying along
munchwing
"mother"
mił
with.

She ran back to the river, and when she got there she heard someone crying "mother" after her.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
me'dil
canoe
yehna[']wildito'n
in she jumped.
yima:n
Across
'ahł-me:na'niłchwit
with it she pushed herself.

She jumped into the boat and pushed it across.

yima:n
Across
yehna[']wiłqe:t
she landed
mił
then
yima:n'ch'in'-ch'ing'
on the other shore
ch'indiqot'-e:
it tumbled.

When she got across, the baby had tumbled down to the other shore.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
dahna[']diwilła:t
she ran
xontah-ch'ing'
to the house.
xa:na:'isdiła:t
She had run up
mił
then
q'ut
de:n'ch'ing'
on this side
ky'a:tehłchweh-ts'iw
it crying she heard.

She ran up to the house and there she heard it crying on that side.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
yehna[']wilła:t
she ran in
mił
then
q'ut
min'day'
back of the house
ky'a:tehłchweh-ts'iw
it crying she heard.

She ran into the house, then she heard it crying back of the house.

ła'ay-xw
At once
na[']nehsday
she sat down
haya:ł-'ung'
and
xontah-q'it
on the house
dahwidqot-ts'iw
it tumbling she heard.

At once she sat down and then she heard it tumble on the roof of the house.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
min'-tsida'
smokehole
q'eh
through
yehwidqot'
it fell.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
nahsdiqo:t
it tumbled about.

The baby tumbled through the smoke-hole and then rolled about on the floor.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
hay
the
do:k'iwile:
old woman
ya[']wiłte:n
picked it up.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xe:q'ay'
cradle
yehna[']wiłte:n
she put it in.

The old woman jumped up and put it in a baby basket.

hay
The
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden
'e:ng'*
it was
yo'n
back of house
dinung
facing
ya:na[']wing'ay
sat down.
do: na:te:d'e'n
She did not look around.
hay mije'e:din
That baby
do: ne:l'e'n
she did not look at.

The young woman sat with her back to the fire and never looked at the child.

hay
The
do:k'iwile:
old woman
wha:ne:
only
ma:lyeh-xw 'a:'iliw
took care of it.

The old woman took care of the baby alone.

hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
after a time
hay
the
mije'e:din
baby
ya:ta'ay-e:
commenced to sit up.
yiwiding-hit
Finally
nahsyay-e:
it commenced to walk.

After a time it commenced to sit up and finally to walk.

yiwiding-hit
After a while
yidichwit
to shoot
me:łkyow-e:
it was big enough.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
do:k'iwile:
old woman
ts'iłting'
bow
wun-na:'usya'
made.
hay-'ung'
And
k'iya:ts
birds
yise:tehłwe:n-e:
he commenced to kill.

When he was big enough to shoot, the old woman made a bow and he began to kill birds.

'ah'ting-q'i-'unt'e:
All kinds
'e:ng'
it was
q'ut
ch'isehłwe:n
he killed.
hay-'ung'
And
hay
the
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden
do: ch'inehł'e'n
never looked at him.
hay
The
michwo:
grandmother
wha:ne:
only
way'iłtiwh
he always gave
hay
diywho'
whatever
yise:'iłwe'
he killed.

Afterward he killed all kinds of game; and, because his mother never looked at him, he gave whatever he killed to his grandmother.

hay
The
xwunchwing
mother
'e:ng'
it was
xutł'e'-dung'-ding
early in the morning
che:'ina:wh-e:
used to go out
da:ywho'-xwo-xowh
somewhere.
łah-xw
Without reason
xa'a[']t'ing-wint'e:
she always did that.
hay-'ung'
And
yiwiding-hit
finally
xo'osday
a man
ts'isle'n-e:
he became.
hay-'ung'
And
hay
xwunchwing
his mother
'e'ilwil-hijit
at dark
na[']ne'ida:wh
used to come back.

Finally he became a man. The young woman had been in the habit of going out at dawn and not returning until dark.

ditsik
Acorns
dahungwho'owh 'a:k'int'e:*
so long
ch'ine'iwiwh
she always brought back.

She brought back with her acorns as long as her finger.

hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
finally
hay
the
q'ung-ch'iwichwil
young man
'a:ch'ondehsne'
thought,
na:xodiwe:s'in'-te:
"I am going to watch her
da:ydi-xw-gya'awh-ung'
what place
mił
from
ch'ine'iwiwh
she always brings
hay
the
ditsik
acorns."
hay
The
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden
'e:ng'
it was
'a:ch'o:'ine'
always thought,
hay
"The
whe:
I
mił
from
ne'iwhwiwh-ding
bring place
mił
from
chiningwin-de'ch
if he will bring
ditsik
acorns,
whiwhxiy'
my boy
xoł-de:ne'-te:
I will call him."
hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
after a time
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
de:di 'ung'
"This time
xowut-xowe:syun'-te:
I will watch her."

One time the young man thought "I am going to watch and see where she goes." The young woman had always said to herself, "If he will bring acorns from the place I bring them, and if he will kill a white deer, I will call him my son."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
xutł'e'-dung'-ding
early in the morning
xowut-ch'ixowehsya'n
he watched her.
haya:ł
And
'ungya'
he saw her
q'ut
ch'e[']ningyay
come out.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
ła'ay-xw
at once
diq'a:n
the ridge
yiduq
up
ch'itehsyay-e:
she went.

Early one morning the son saw his mother come out of the house and start up the ridge.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xoka:
after her
ch'itehsyay
he went
ch'ixoditehł'e'n
watching her.
haya:ł
And
hayah
there
yiduq
up
xa:'usyay
she went.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
k'ikine'
dry tree
k'isxa:n
standing
mikin'-ding
its butt
ch'iningya:-hit
when she came to
k'e:'isyay-e:
she climbed up.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
hay
that
k'ikine'
dry tree
xoł tehłchwe:n
with her grew
de:-nohq'it-ch'ing'
toward the sky.

He followed her and saw her go along until she came to a dry tree. She climbed this and it grew with her to the sky.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
hay
that
q'un-ch'iwichwil
young man
na[']tehsdiyay
went home.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
yisxun-de'
"Tomorrow
whe:
I
na:se:y'-te:
will go."

The young man then returned saying, "To-morrow I am going up there."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
wilwe:tł'
dark
mił
after
na:'ndiyay
she came back.
q'ut
ch'ininge:n
She brought
ditsik
acorns.

The woman came home at night with the usual load of long acorns.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
yisxung-hit
in the morning
ch'itehsyay
he went.
ch'iningyay
He got to
hay
that
k'ikine'
dry tree
k'isxun-ding
standing place.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
k'e:'isyay
he climbed up.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
xoł tehłchwe:n
it grew with him.
hay-'ung'
And
de:-nohq'it
to the sky
xoł xahschwe:n-e:
it grew up.

The next morning the man went the way his mother had gone, climbed the tree as he had seen her do, and it grew with him to the sky.

haya:ł
And
'ungya'
he saw
tin
road
ning'a:
was there.

When he arrived there he saw a road.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hay
it
miq'i[t]
on
ch'itehsyay
he went.
ch'iqa:l-hit
As he walked along
'ungya'
he saw
k'isxung
standing
k'inehst'a:n
Tan oak.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
k'e:'isyay
he climbed
hay
that
k'inehst'a:n
Tan oak.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
hayah
there
dahya[']wehs'a'
he sat down.

He followed that until he came to an oak, which he climbed, and waited to see what would happen.

do:-winsa'a:y-mił
Soon after
'ungya'
he heard
ło'-xodiwising'ił-ts'iw
laughing along the road.
sa:k'iding
He was surprised
'ungya'
to see
ch'itindił
coming
k'ehłtsa:n*
maidens.

Soon he heard laughing girls approaching.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
ch'inte:de:tł'*
they got there.
'aht'in-ding-mił
From every place
ch'iningyay
they came.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
ky'a:da[']ne: xowinse'n
they commenced to pick.
hay-'ung'
And
'ahtin-ne
all of them
'iłne:jit
divisions
ya[']wiłdichwe:n
had made
hay
which
me'
in
ky'a:da[']ne:
they picked.

They came to the tree and began to pick acorns from allotted spaces under it.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
k'iwinya'n
acorns
xoda'iłq'a:s
he threw down.

The young man began to throw down acorns.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ya[']de:ne'
they said,
xa'uleh
"That is right,
k'ist'ay'-chwing
Bluejay."

"That's right Blue Jay," said one of the girls.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
łiwung
one of them
'a[']de:ne'
said,
xa:xowilwa:tł'
"Dug-from-the-ground
tsa:ng'
it might be."

Then another said, "It might be Dug-from-the-ground.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
k'iye:
again
łiwung
one
'a[']de:ne'
said,
xunay*
xa:xowilwa:tł'
"Dug-from-the-ground
ch'in do:ng'
they say
ła'ay-xw
really
do: ch'ixonehł'in'-te:-nehwa:n
you can hardly look at."

You can hardly look at him, they say, he is so handsome."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
nahnin
two
'a[']diwe:ne'
said,
a:
(Excl.)
do: ch'in
"They say
xone:ył'in'-tehł
I can't look at him.
[hay-ma:ng]
Always
de:di
this
qa:l*
walking
xone'iwh'e'n
I am accustomed to look at.
hay
That
do:ng'
it is
q'ut
do: ch'ixonehł'in'-te:
one can look at
ch'inehwa:n
hardly."
haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ya[']de:ne'
they said,
whe:-'e'n
"I
ch'ixone:ył'in'-te:
can look at him."

Two others said, "Oh, I can look at him, I always look at this walking one (pointing to the sun) that is the one you can hardly look at."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
na:na[']widyay
he came down.
ła'ay-xw
Really
ya:xotuq
between the two
ya[']ningyay
he walked.

He came down from the tree and passed between the the girls.

haya:ł
And
ła'ay-xw
really
xoning'
their faces
na:na:ya'wilay
they turned down.
do:-heh ya[']xonehł'e'n
They could not look at him
hayi-q'
so
ningxa'-ch'inehwung
good-looking he was.

The two who had boasted they could look at him, turned their faces to the ground.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
hayo:w
those
nahnin
two
wha:ne:
only
ya[']xonehł'e'n
looked at him
hay
who
'a:ya[']de:ne'
said,
nehe:-'eng'
"We
do:-xoling xone:dil'e:n
can't look at him."

The other two who had thought they could not look him in the face were able to do so.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hay
the
k'iłixung
deer
'e:ng'
that one
q'ut
ch'isehłwe:n
he killed
hay
which
'a:ch'o:'ine'
she thought,
hay
"That
ch'isehłwin-de'ch
if he kills
whimije'e:din[']
my child
xoł-de:ne'-te:
I will call him."

The young man killed the deer, the killing of which the mother had made the second condition for his recognition as a son.

ky'a:da[']we:ne'
He picked acorns
hay
the
xwunchwing
his mother's
miky'a:da[']ne:-ye:
picking place
me'
in.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
na[']tehsdiyay
he went home.
na:'ndiyay-e:
He got back
k'inchiwhi-q'it
to Kintcu:hwikut.

He then filled the basket from his mother's place under the tree and went home.

yehch'iwinge:n
He brought in
hay
the
ditsik
acorns
dahungwho'owh 'a:k'ingt'e:
so long
hayahujit-'ung'
and then
xowhxiy'
her boy
mił
with
łing'-wint'e'n-e:
she called him.
hay-'ung'
Then
xa'a'iniw
he always did that.

When the woman saw him with the acorns as long as one's finger, she called him her son.

hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
after a time
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
xontah
"Houses
na:se:y'-te:
I am going to."

After a time he said, "I am going visiting."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
do:k'iwile:
the old woman
'a[']de:ne'
said
xa'
"All right."
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hay
the
do:k'iwile:
old woman
tse:-łitsow
blue-stone
ts'iłting'
bow
wun-na:'usya'
made,
tse:-łitsow
blue-stone
na:tse:s
arrows,
tse:-łitsow
blue-stone
mił-k'itiquch
shinny stick,
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweat-house wood
q'ina'
too.

"All right," said the grandmother, and then she made for him a bow and arrows of blue-stone, and a shinny stick and sweat-house wood of the same material.

xots'e:l'
His biceps
q'eh
along
no[']niłqe:t
he pushed them.

These he took and concealed by putting them under the muscles of his forearm.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xong'-'a:na[']diwilaw
he dressed himself.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
ch'itehsyay
he went
yiduqa-to:-me'-ch'in'
eastern water toward.
haya:ł
And
yiduqa-to:-me'-ch'in'
eastern water
ch'e[']ningyay-e:
he came out to,
de:n'ch'ing'
This shore
ch'iningyay-e:
he came to.

He dressed himself for the journey and set out. He went to the home of the immortals at the edge of the world toward the east. When he got down to the shore on this side they saw him.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
ch'e[']ninta:n
he took out
hijit-'ung'
and then
ch'ite:te:yo:s
he stretched
me'dil
a canoe.
hayahujit
And
tehch'iwinta:n
he put it in the water.
hijit
Then
yima:n
across
xoch'ing'
toward him
yehwidqe:t
he landed.
tse:l-nehwa:n
Red obsidian
hay
that
me'dil
canoe.

One of them took out the canoe of red obsidian and stretched it until it was the proper size. He launched it and came across for him.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
hay
the
xoch'ing'
toward him
yehwidqe:t-ding
landing place
yehch'iwingya:-ding
in entering
mining'-q'it
the bow on
da[']k'iłkis
he put his hand
mił
then
k'iwingk'e:t'
gave a creak.

When he had landed, the young man placed his hand on the bow and as he did so, the boat gave a creak, he was so strong.

haya:ł
And
q'ut
yima:n
across
yehwidqe:t
he landed.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xontah-ding
house place
xa:'usyay
he went up.

When they had crossed he went to the village.

xo'ch
Right
minilohts
in the middle
sa'ung
stood
hay
the
xontah
house.
tse:-łitsow
Blue-stone
hay
that
xontah
house.
to:nehwa:n
Black obsidian
k'iwilte:l
was paved
mi[n]day'-q'
outside
hay
that
xontah
house.

In the middle of it he saw a house of blue-stone with a pavement in front of black obsidian.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
yehch'iwinyay
he went in.
hayo:w-xw yiduq
Up that way,
whiwunda:n
"My son-in-law
sa'a:
long time
xoxa:
for him
te:ng'in'-te:
you will look"
mił*
with.

He went in and heard one say, "It is my son-in-law for whom I had expected to be a long time looking."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
already
wha:
sun
na:na:dyay
was down.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
łe:nunidyay
gathered back
'aht'ing-ding-mił
from all places.
minłung
Ten
łiłing
brothers
xola:n
he saw there were.

When the sun had set there came back from different places ten brothers.

me:lah
Some
k'itiquch-xosin-xola:n
shinny had been playing he saw,
me:lah
some
king-mił
king
na[']k'idił-xola:n
had been playing he saw,
me:lah
some
k'iwunay[']dił-xosin-xola:n
hunting had been he saw,
me:lah
some
ky'ohłkis-xosin-xola:n
spearing salmon had been he saw,
me:lah
some
na:k'e'its-xosin-xola:n
shooting at mark had been he saw.

Some had been playing king,* some had been playing shinny, some had been hunting, some spearing salmon, and others had been shooting at a mark.

tismil
Eagle
mining'-mił-łe:diliw*
and Panther
hił
both
'ut-t'e:n-xola:n
were married he saw.**

Eagle and Panther were both married to daughters of the family.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ya[']xołch'ide:ne'
they said to him,
de:-xw-xolung
"You here,
whila:-tsing
my brother-in-law."*

They said to him, "You here, brother-in-law?"

haya:ł-'ung'
And
he:yung
"Yes,"
ch'ide:ne'
he said,
da'n
"a while ago
ne:yay
I came."

"Yes," he said, "I came a little while ago."

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
na[']diwilchwa'n
it was supper time.
xoyeh
Before him
wingxa'
they put
k'iwidqot
a basket
me'
in
mił-ky'o:xe:t
dentalia
mitsing'
its meat.
hay
That
k'iwinya'n-ya:n
Indians
do: sa:yixa:wh
can't swallow.

When it was supper time they put in front of him a basket of money's meat,* which mortal man cannot swallow.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xong
he
nahx
two
me'
in
ch'inehłya:n
ate up.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ya[']xondehsne'
they thought of him,
'a:k'itise:-xw
"Smart
'a:'unt'e:
he is."

He ate two baskets of it and they thought he must be a smart man.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
no[']dinilchwa'n
they finished supper
hijit-'ung'
then
q'ut
ch'e[']te:de:tł'
they went out
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
mich'ing'
toward.
haya:ł
And
q'ut
ch'e[']ningyay
went out
xong
he
q'ing'
too
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
mich'ing'
toward.

After they had finished supper they all went to the sweat-house to spend the night.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xutł'e'-e:-mił
at midnight
to:-ch'ing'
to the river
na:me: tehsyay
to swim he went.

At midnight the young man went to the river to swim.

to:-ding
At the river
ch'e:ningya:-hit
when he got
'ungya'
he heard
hayo:w-xw
that way
yida:ch'ing
down
mił
with
'a:xoł-ch'ide:n'-ts'iw
he heard say
ta:ysts'e:y'
"Sweathouse wood
'e:ng'
do:-xoling
is gone."

There he heard a voice say, "The sweat-house wood is all gone."

de:di-xw
"Around here
q'ut
'e:ng'
it is
k'iwinya'n-ya:n
people
xa'a'iniw
always do that.
do: yiłtsis
One never sees
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweathouse wood
digyung
here.
yinuqi-yiduq
To the southeast
wha:ne:
only
'e:ng'
there is
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweat-house wood."
te:wina:whing'
Mink
'e:ng'
it was
hay
who
'a:ne'
said it.

Then Mink told him that men could not find sweat-house wood near by, but that some was to be found to the southeast.

haya:ł-'ung'
And,
'ung'
"Yes,"
xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he said.
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
They said to him
minłung
ten
ta:kiwh
sweathouses
sa'a:n
standing.
hayi-tah
To all,
'ung'
"Yes,"
xoł-ch'idwinehł
he kept saying.

They called to him for wood from ten sweat-houses and he said "Yes" to all.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
'aht'ing
everything
xoł-ch'ixowilik
he told him
hay daydi
that
wung-no[']xoniłt'in-te:
he is going to get him to do.

Mink told him about everything they would ask him to do.

hayahujit
And then
q'ut
ta:kiwh-ding
sweathouse place
xa:na:'usdiyay
he went up.
yehna[']widyay
He went in.

He went back to the sweat-house and went in.

hayahujit
And
xołiqay
dawn
tehsyay
it had come,
mił
then
ch'e[']ningyay
he went out
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweat-house wood
mixa:
after,
q'ut
as
xong
he
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
had told him.

When the east whitened with the dawn, he went for sweat-house wood as they had told him.

nahx
Two
tin
roads
'iłwah wing'a'
forked.
ła'
One
digyung
here
nohoł
from us
yide'-yiduq
northeast.
ła'
One
digyung
here
yinuqi-yiduq
southeast.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hay
the
tin
road
'iłwah wing'a'-ding
forking place
ch'iningyay
he arrived.

He came to the place where the trail forks and one of them turns to the northeast and the other to the southeast.

hijit
Then
'a:dits'e:l'
his biceps
q'eh
along under
ch'e[']ningyo:s
he pull out
hay
that
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweat-house wood.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
ya:na:'isk'il
he split it.

There he drew out from his arm the wood his grandmother had provided him with and split it fine.

hijit-'ung'
Then
minłung
ten
ts'isloy'
he made bundles.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
ya[']wime:tł'
he took them up.
hayahujit-'ung'
Then
na[']tehsdiyay
he went home.

He made this into ten bundles and carried them back to the village.

hay-'ung'
And
hay
the
na:'ndiya:-ding
he got back place
xo'dzi-nehwa:n
carefully
no[']ning'a:n
he put it down.
ła'ay-xw
Really
'aht'in-ding
every place
wildił-e:
shook.

When he got there he put them down carefully but the whole earth shook with the shock.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
'aht'in-ding
every place
ła'
one
mida' ning'a:n
to it mouth he carried,
minłung
the ten
ta:kiwh
sweathouses.

He carried a bundle to each sweat-house.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
'aht'in-ding
at all the places
xoł ya:te:lit
they smoked themselves.

They all sweated themselves.

hayahujit-'ung'
And
wilwe:tł'
until night
ts'isda:-xw
he stayed
hayah
there.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
wilwe:tł'-ding
at night
q'ut
k'iye:
again
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
yehch'ite:de:tł'
they went into.

He spent the day there and at evening went again to the sweat-house.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
to:-ding
to the river
ch'e[']ningyay
he went
k'iye:
again.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
hayah
there
te:wina:whing'
Mink
k'iye:
again
hayah
there
xowung
to him
ch'iningyay
came.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he told him
yisxung
"Tomorrow
k'ite:singquch-tehł
you will play shinny."

When he went to the river to swim, Mink met him again and told him that the next day they would play shinny.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
yisxung-hit
next day
q'ut
xutł'e'-dung'
in the morning
na[']diwilchwa'n
they commenced to eat.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
no[']dinilchwa'n
they had finished
mił
then
q'ut
'a:ya[']xołch'ide:ne'
they said to him,
xa'
"Come
whiq'e:y
brother-in-law,
ya:ydił
let us go
k'itiquch-ch'ing'
to the shinny place."

After they were through breakfast the next morning, they said, "Come, brother-in-law, let us go to the place where they play shinny."

hayahujit-'ung'
And
q'ut
sahwinde'n
they all went.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
ch'inte:de:tł'
they got there.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
łiy sile'n
they made bets.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
k'ite:quch
they begin to play.

They all went and after placing their bets began to play.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
nahding
twice
xowung
from them
na:ya[']niwehsdilay
they took the bet.

Twice they were beaten.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
'a:ya[']xołch'ide:ne'
to him they said,
xa'
"Come
whiq'e:y
brother-in-law,
'iloy'
play."

Then they said, "Come, brother-in-law, play."

xowa:-ya'inta:n
They gave him
mił-k'itiquch
a shinny stick.

They passed him a stick.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'iłq'i[t] niłchwit
he pressed down on
hay
that
mił-k'itiquch
stick.
ła'ay-xw
Really
ch'isgya:s-e:
he broke it.

He pressed down on it and broke it.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
ka'
"Well
whe:
I
diywhe'eh
something
ya:ytun'-ta:ng'
may pick up."

"Let me pick up something," he said.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xots'e:l'-q'eh
from under his arm
ch'e[']ninyo:s
he pulled out
hay
that
xong
his own
xomił-k'itiquch
shinny stick.
ch'e[']nilay
He pulled out
ya:dimil
the balls
q'ina'
too.

He turned about and drew out his concealed shinny stick and the balls.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
ch'e[']ningyay
he stepped out.
no[']k'ining'a:n
He started the game.
k'imiłna:tul'-jiwol
Wildcat
xolung
he saw
xoch'ing'
against him
ch'isloy'
playing.

Then he stepped out to play and Wildcat came to play against him.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xa[']wingquch
he threw out.
'isdo'
Very near
ła'ay-xw
really
ch'e[']ningquch-ne'in
the throw used to be
me:dimil
the stake
kin'-ding
its foot
no:ndimil
fell.

The visitor made the stroke and the balls fell very near the goal.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hayah
there
k'imiłna:tul'-jiwol-ne'in
Wildcat used to be
ch'ixołkit
he caught.
ła'ay-xw
Really
xoning'-ne'in
his face used to be
łe:yehch'iwingye:wh
he jammed in.
hayah
There
xa:ya[']wehs'a'
he sits that way.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
ch'e[']ningquch-e:
he threw it over.

Then he caught Wildcat smashing his face into its present shape, and threw the ball over the line.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
k'iye:
again
na[']k'iwing'a:
they played.
michwa:n'-tułta:n
Fox
xolung
he saw
xoch'ing'
against him
ch'isloy'
played.

He played again, this time with Fox.

hayahujit-'ung'
And
k'iye:
again
xowung
from him
xa[']wingquch
he threw.
hayahujit-'ung'
And
ch'ixołkit
he caught him.
ła'ay-xw
Really
xoning'
his face
ch'e[']niłt'ik'
he pinched out.
xa'
That way
miq'eh
afterward
'a[']niwehst'e'
he looked.

Again he made the stroke and when he caught Fox he pinched his face out long as it has been ever since.

k'iye:
Again
ya[']wingquch
he threw.
ch'e[']ningquch-e:
He threw over the line.

He then struck the ball over the line and won.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
k'iye:
again
na[']k'iwing'a:
they started a game.
nin'-miwina:-k'iste:n*
Earthquake
xolung
he saw
xoch'ing'
against him
ch'isloy'
played.

The next time he played against Earthquake.

hay-'ung'
And
ła'ay-xw
really
nin'-ne'in
ground used to be
na:dite:yay
opened up.
hayi-heh
Anyhow
mitis
over
dahch'itehłto'n-e:
he jumped,
xa:xowilwa:tł'
Dug-from-the-ground.

The ground opened up a chasm but he jumped over it.

hayi-heh
Anyhow
xowung
from him
ch'e[']ningquch
he threw out.
xo:
His
tse:-łitsow
blue-stone
ya:na:tuqi-ch'ischwe'n
he made come between.
hayi-heh
Anyhow
wundimil-e:
it went through.

Earthquake threw up a wall of blue-stone but he threw the ball through it.

dol
"Dol"
diwine'-ts'iw
it sounded he heard.
hay
That
wundimil
going through
'e:ng'
it was
'a:diwe:ne'
made the noise.

"Dol" it rang as it went through.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
k'ehniwh
Thunder
xoch'ing'
against him
ch'isloy'
played
xolung
he saw.

Then he played with Thunder.

hay-'ung'
And
ła'ay-xw
really
na:ngyay
it rained
mił
then
k'e:we:niwh
it thundered.

It rained and there was thunder.

hay-'ung'
And
hay
the
dahch'idiwilła:t
running
mił
with
'a:diwe:ne'
made the noise.

It was the running of that one which made the noise.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
wilwe:tł'
it was evening.
hay-'ung'
And
'aht'ing
all
na:na[']ning'a:n
he won back
hay
which
xowung
from them
na:ya[']niliwh-ne'in
had been lost.

It was then night and he had won back all they had lost.

minłung
Ten
'isdits'
strings
xowh
about
mił-ky'o:xe:t
of dentalia,
diywho'
some
ło:q'-yiditile:
otterskins,
ts'iduqi-na'we-ne'in
fisherskin quivers,
t'e'-ne'in
blankets,
'aht'ing-q'a-'unt'e:-ne'in
everything used to be
na:na[']ning'a:n
he won back.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
sahna:nde'n
they went home.

There were ten strings of money, besides otterskins, flsherskins, and blankets.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
yisxun-hit
next day
mich'ing'
toward
sahwinde'n
they went
tit'awi-łiqay
the great bird white
hay
that
dahya:na[']wehs'a'
sat there
hay
which
k'iwinya'n-ya:n
Indians
do:
never
mich'ing'
to it
yik'ite:'its
can shoot.

The next day they went to shoot at the white bird which Indians can never hit.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
ch'o:ya:n'its
they began to shoot.
xong
He
'e:ng'
do: wung-no'iłqe:t
did not shoot.
hay-'ung'
And
'a:ya[']xołch'ide:ne'
they said to him,
xa'
"Come
ning
you
midiłwa:
in turn
wun-nohłqeh
shoot."

The others commenced to shoot and then they said to their guest, "Come, you better shoot."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
ts'iłting'
bow
xowa:-ya'inta:n
they gave him.
hay-'ung'
And
ch'itehslay
he drew it.
ła'ay-xw
Really
sigya:s-e:
it broke.

They gave him a bow, which broke when he drew it.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xong
his own
xots'iłting'
bow
ch'e[']ninta:n
he took out.
'a[']de:ne'
He said,
de:di-heh
"This anyhow
mił
with
wun-no:nehłqe:t
I will shoot.
nichwing'
No good,
q'ina'
too
mina:t
around
no:na:wit'a:ts'
is cut down."

Then he pulled out his own and said, "I will shoot with this although the nock has been cut down and it is not very good."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a:ya[']xondehsne'
they thought,
hayo:w
"That
mił
with
miq'it
to it
dahna[']dohł'a'
he can shoot."*

They thought, " He can't hit anything with that."

hay-'ung'
And
wun-no[']niłqe:t
he shot.
ła'ay-xw
Really
miq'it
to it
dahna'diwił'a'-e:
he hit.
hay-'ung'
And
na:lts'it
fell down
ła'ay-xw
really
mił-ky'o:xe:t
dentalia
dahungwho'owh
so much
no:k'iningyo:wh
scattered about.

He shot and hit the bird, and dentalia fell all about.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
na[']k'iwe:-xowinse'n
they brought home
hay
that
mił-ky'o:xe:t
dentalia.

They gathered up the money and carried it home.

hayahujit-'ung'
And
na[']tehsdiyay
he went home
hay
xochwo:
his grandmother
mich'ing'
to.
hay-'ung'
And
na:'ndiyay-e:
he got back
k'inchiwhi-q'it
to Kintcu:whwhikut.

The Hupa man went home to his grandmother at Kintcu:whwhikut.

dunłungwho'-ding
So many
wilwe:tł'
nights
sile'n
as it seemed
de:di-de:
he found out
dunłungwho'-ding
so many
me:nundiyay
years
na[']wa:-xw
he stayed.

As many nights as it seemed to him he had spent, so many years he had really been away.

hay-'ung'
And
na:'ndiya:-hit
when he got back
hay
xochwo:-ne'in
his grandmother used to be
xong'
fire
me:w
beside
site:n
was lying.

He found his grandmother lying by the fire.

xowung
About him
xoje:' k'ich'ing' ya:siling'-xola:n
they had worried he found out.

Both of the women had been worried about him.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
nohxa:
"After you
'e:ng'
it is
na:whdiyay
I have come."

He said to them, "I have come back for you."

'ung'
"Yes,"
ya[']de:ne'
they said,
q'ut do:ng'
"all right
ya:te:se'tł-te:
we will go."

"Yes," they said, "we will go."

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xo'ch
good
'a:na[']ch'ilaw
he fixed
xontah
the house.
'aht'in-ding
Every place
me:na[']k'isloy'
he bound it up.

Then he repaired the house, tying it up anew with hazel withes.

hijit-'ung'
Then
me:w
under
na[']k'isqot
he pushed a stick.
digyung
Here
yiduqa-to:-me'-ch'in'
eastern water
wing'a'-e:
it went.
haya:-ch'ing'
There
ya[']de:lts'e'-e:
they lived
hay
where
'ut-t'e:n ts'islin'-ch'ing'
he married.

He poked a stick under it and away it went to the end of the world toward the east, where he had married.

de:di-xowh
Now
haya:-ch'ing'
there
ya[']dehłts'ey-e:
they are living.
hayah no:nt'ik'
Here is the end.

They are living there yet.