Hupa Online Dictionary and Texts



Xonchwiwh-dich'e:ch'** (Rough-nose)*
*Told at Hupa, July, 1901, by Mary Marshall, wife of James Marshall. She was born at Miskût about 1868, where she lived most of the time until her marriage. Her mother was a Yurok who was married to a Hupa.
**A wood rasp is called by the Hupa tsel-tce ditc-tcetc, "iron rough."

xonchwiwh-dich'e:ch'
His-nose-rough
ch'idehłts'e:
lived
xokil
his younger brother
hił
both.

Rough-nose lived with his younger brother.

'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
He said to him,
do: de[']ditiwh
"One must never put in the fire
je:xo-ma'-din
short ribs."
łah-xw wint'e:
Always
xa'a:xołch'ine:
he was telling him that.

He used to say to him, "Never put the short ribs of the deer in the fire to roast."

hayah-mił
And
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
duxwe:di-hit
"Why
'a:whił-ch'ine:
does he always tell me that.

One day when Rough-nose was away hunting the younger brother got to thinking about it. "Why does he always tell me that?" he thought.

keh
Let
de:diwhtung
me put them in the fire."

"I am going to roast them."

hayah-mił
And
de[']diwinta:n
he put them in.
hayah-mił
And
ya[']xołte:n-e:
it carried him off.

When he had roasted them something carried him off.

hayah-mił
And
na:'ndiyay
he came home
wilwe:tł'
at night
mił
then
do: 'ungya'
he saw
ch'ixole:n-e:
he was gone.

The older brother came home at night and looked everywhere for his brother but could not find him.

haya:ł
And
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
q'ut
xola:n de[']diwinta:n
"He has put in the fire
je:xo-ma'-din
short ribs."
hayah-mił
And
ch'iwinchwiw
he cried.

"He must have roasted the short ribs," he thought and began to cry.

'e'ilwil
Every day
ch'ichweh-xw
he cried.

He mourned every day for his brother.

tł'o:q'-q'it
The prairie - on
ya'a'a'
he sat.
xoyeh
Near him
na:da'a:
stood
xotits'e'
his cane.

He used to sit out on the prairie with his cane sticking up beside him.

hayah-mił
And
chwe:ge:-yixolwhin
Meadow lark
dahche'ixis
used to light
tits'-q'it
cane on.
hayah-mił
And
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he said,
xokil
"His brother
dahdiwilte:n
has been carried off."

A bird would come and light on the cane and say, "His brother has been carried off, his brother has been carried off."

mine:jixomił
After a time
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
'isdo'
"I wish
duxo:'-q'
something
'a:wilah
would happen
'iwhkit
so I could catch him.
xose:sehłwin-te:
I will kill him."

After several days Rough-nose thought to himself, "I wish I could do something to him, I wish I could catch him, I wish I could kill him."

haya:ł
And
jeh
pitch
k'e[']wiłt'a'n
he put
tits'
cane
milay'
on top.
hayahujit
And then
yisxung-hit
next day
ch'e[']ningyay
he went out.
k'iye:
Again
hayah
there
ch'inehsday
he sat down.

The next day when he went out to sit down he put pitch on the top of his cane.

hayah
There
do:-winsa'a:y-mił
soon
q'it
on it
dahch'iwingxits
he lit.
hayah-mił
And
ch'ixo:łkit
he caught him.

The bird came and lit on it as usual and was easily caught.

nise:sehłwin-te:
"I will kill you,"
xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he said.

"Now I will kill you," he said.

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
do:-whise:lwe:n-heh
"Don't kill me.
nił-xwe:lik-te:
I will tell you
hay
da:ydi-ding
where
mił
ya[']xołte:n
he has taken him.

"Don't kill me," said the bird, "I will tell you where they have taken him.

de:nohq'it
In the world above
xoyeh
under him
wilq'a'n-e:
a fire is burning.
de:di-xw
Now
wha:ne:
only
ła'
one
xoch'ing'
by him
na:wilit-e:
will be burned.

They are roasting him in the world above.

łe:k'ixolah
Gather people.
me:lah
Some
k'iwindits-te:
will make rope.

Gather the people, and have them make rope.

hayah-mił
And
hay
that
miq'i(t)
on
sahwohdin'-te:
you will travel.

With the help of that you can go there.

whe:
I
de:nohq'it
world above
nohna:tse:
ahead of you
ne:ya:-te:
I will go."

I will go ahead of you."

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
łe:ya[']k'ixolaw
he gathered the people.

Then Rough-nose called the people together:

k'iłwe:-kyoh
Spider
k'iwindits-te:
to make rope,
xontehł-taw
Coyote
q'ina'
too.
ło'n
Mouse
łah-xw
just
da[']k'inyun'-te:
to chew off
ts'iłting'
bow
mitł'o:l'
strings.
hayah-mił-'ung'
And
chw'ah-le:
Frog
'e:ng'
was
de:k'idilich-te:
to urinate on the fires,
ya'
Lice
'e:ng'
were
tsiwung
hair
łe[']k'iniłye'ts-te:
to tie together,
qo:-qot'
Catterpillar
'e:ng'
was
tin
road
ch'ischwin'-te:
to make.

Spider and Coyote to make rope, Mouse to chew off the bowstrings, Frog to put out the fires, Louse to tie together the enemy by their hair as they slept, Caterpillar to make the trail.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
ya[']k'iwindits
they made rope.

Coyote and Spider commenced to make the rope.

hay-'ung'
And
de:xosin-mił
soon
ła'
one
je:lo'
storage basket
sile'n
filled
xontehł-taw
Coyote
xok'iwididze'
his rope.
k'iłwe:-kyoh
Spider's
'e:ng'
'unt'eh
looked
yi'e:
small,
na:lma:ts'
coil
ła'
one.

Coyote soon had a storage basket full, but Spider's rope was fine and looked like only one coil.

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
q'ut
xontehł-taw
Coyote
'a[']de:ne'
said,
yo:w
"That
wha:ne:
alone
nisah
long way
ningya:-te:
will reach
nehwung
looks like."
wun ło'-ch'ischwe'n
About it he laughed.

Coyote made fun of it saying, "That looks as if it would reach a long way."

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
xa'
"Come,
dunda:ng'
who
mił
with it
ch'idiwinchwit-te:
will shoot?"

"Well who will shoot?" said Rough-nose.

haya:ł
And
xontehł-taw
Coyote
'a[']de:ne'
said
whe:
"I."

"I," said Coyote.

hayah-mił
And
ch'idiwinchwit
he shot.

He tied his rope to an arrow and shot.

hay xok'iwiditse'
His rope
no:nundimil
fell back.

Soon it fell back.

hayah-mił
And
k'iłwe:-kyoh
Spider
midiłwa:
in turn
ch'idiwinchwit
shot.

Then Spider shot with his rope.

ye:w
Way
yiduq
up
do: 'o:na:wehs'e'n-e:
it could not be seen.

It went up and up until it could be seen no longer.

xa:t'
Yet
na:wehsma:ts'
it was coiled.
k'iwindil-e:-ts'iw
they heard it ring
de:nohq'it-ch'ing'
against the sky.

When one coil of rope was still left they heard the arrow strike the sky with a ringing noise.

hayah-mił
And
'a:ya[']de:ne'
he said to them,
dunda:ng'
"Who
tin
road
ch'ischwin'-te:
will make?"

Then Rough-nose said, "Who will go ahead and make the trail?"

hayah-mił
And
xontehł-taw
Coyote
'a[']de:ne'
said,
whe:
"I
sehłchwin'-te:
will make it."

"I," said Coyote.

haya:ł
And
q'ut
ch'itehsyay
he started.
hayah-mił
And
xoda:na:widxits'
he fell back.

He started up but soon came tumbling back.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
qo:-qot'
catterpillar
ch'itehsyay
started.

Then Caterpillar tried it.

de:d
This way
na:na:'isdiwich
down he leaned.
hayah-mił
And
xontehł-taw
Coyote
'a[']de:ne'
said,
na[']widxisił
"He is falling."
ye:w
Way
yiduq
up
na:'iłkit-e:
he caught it.

He leaned way back and Coyote called out, "He is falling;" but he caught the rope again higher up.

mine:jixomił
After a time
do: na:ya[']xo:łtsa:n
they did not see him.

Soon they could see him no longer.

na[']widahł
He was coming back
'ungya'
they saw.
me[']niłxa'
He had finished.

Then they saw he had finished the trail and was coming back.

hayah-mił
And
'a:ya[']de:ne'
he said to them,
xa'
"Come,
sa'ohding'
travel."

"Well, go on up," said Rough-nose.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
sahwinde'n
they travelled.
xonchwiwh-dich'e:ch'
Rough-nose
ch'itehłte:n
took along
mixontaw'-xole:n*
Woodrat.
'a:dit'ah
In his sack
ch'iwiłte:n
he put him

Rough-nose caught a wood-rat and put it in his sack and then went with the rest.

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
digyung
"Here
de:sohłts'e:-te:
you will stay.
whe:
I
na:tse:
ahead
ne:ya:-te:
will go to
hay
the
xon'-ding
fire place."

When they reached the world above he said to the others, "You wait here, I will go along to the place where the fire is."

hayahujit
And then
do:k'iwile:
old woman
'a:na[']dilaw
he made himself.
k'isdiya:n-chwing
A widow,
tits'
cane
k'itehłtits'
he walked with.

He changed himself into an old woman and walked with a widow's cane.

hay
The
xon'-ding
fire place
ch'iningyay
he came to.
haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
xong'
"Fire
'e:ng'
it is
kyungxowhtiw
I am begging."

He came up to the place and said, "I am only asking that I may warm myself by your fire."

haya:ł
And
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
she said to him,
ning
"You
ts'a:ng'
might be
xonchwiwh-dich'e:ch'
Rough-nose."

"You might be Rough-nose," said the old woman who was tending the fire.

haya:ł
And
diye:
"Yes,"
ch'ide:ne'
he said.
hay
"That
gya:n'
is the one
digyung
here
ch'iningya:-te:
will come."*

"Oh, yes, that fellow is likely to come here," said Rough-nose.

haya:ł
And
ch'itehłda:wh
she ran up
xola'
her hand
me'
in
na:da'ay
sticking up
nisking
a Douglas spruce
min'day'
outside.
hijit
Then
ya:na[']k'isdimil-e:
she smashed it.
haya:ł
And
łe:na'iliwh
she started the fire.

Then the old woman ran up with a spruce tree in her hand, smashed it to pieces, and threw it on the fire.

haya:ł
And
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
she said to him,
tso:
"Tso:
tso:
tso:"
ch'ide:ne'
he said,
je:xo-ma'-din
"ribs
de:dintiwh
you put in the fire."
de:-xw
xong'
Fire
mina'[w]ilda:l
around she ran.

She commenced poking the bag in which the boy was hanging over the fire. "Tso, tso," he cried. "You had better roast the short ribs," she said.

haya:ł
And
na[']diwilchwun'-ts'iw
he heard them eating
xontah
house
-me'-ch'ing'
in.
hayah
There
ch'ixołkit
he caught her.
xon'-ding
Fire in
ch'ixo:nta'n
he held her.

Rough-nose waited until he heard them eating in the house, then he caught the old woman and held her in the fire until she was dead.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hay xoch'ing'
what on her
sila:-ne'in
used to be
'a:dich'ing'
himself
no[']nilay
he put on.

He stripped her clothes off and dressed himself in them.

hayah-mił
And
xowun-na[']k'isle'
he felt of him.
haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
ning
"You
'ung
is that
'ung'
xonchwiwh-dich'e:ch'
Rough-nose?"

He went up to the sack and felt of his brother, who said, "Is that you Rough-nose?"

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
xo'dzi-nehwa:n-e:
"Softly
xiningyehwh
speak."
hayah-mił
And
ch'e:na[']xoniłte:n
he took out
hay xokil
his brother
haya:ł
and
mixontaw'-xole:n
Woodrat
yehch'iwiłte:n
he put in
hayah
there.

"Speak softly," said Rough-nose, and then he took the boy out and put the wood-rat in his place.

haya:ł
And
xoning'
his face
ch'e[']niłqe:t
he put out.
na:k'ingyung
"Come eat,"
xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he said.

Then someone put his head out of the door of the house and said, "Come and eat."

haya:ł
And
łah-xw
only
xoning'
his face
yehwehs'a'
was in
min'-t'ah
the hallway.
'a[']de:ne'
He said,
łah-xw
"Just
digyung
here
diywhe'eh
anything
whiwiłq'ahs
throw me."

Rough-nose putting only his head in, said, "Just throw something out here for me."

haya:ł
And
q'ut
k'iwinya'n
he ate it.
ch'e:na:'indiyay
He went out.

When he had eaten he went to the sack and began punching it.

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
tso:
"Tso:
tso:
tso:,"
ch'ide:ne'
he said.

"Tso, tso," it cried.

je:xo-ma'-din
"Ribs
dong'
de:dintiwh
you put in the fire."

"You better roast the short ribs," said Rough-nose.

hayah-mił
And
q'ut
ch'inte:te:ch'
they went to bed.
haya:ł
And
xwe:diwiliw
they attacked them.

When the people had gone to bed, Rough-nose and his companions made an attack on them. All was confusion. It was dark. The fires had been put out.

haya:ł
And
me:lah
some
'a:ya[']diwine:l
were saying,
'uloh
"Hurts
whe:da'ay
my hair."

Some of them cried out, "My hair hurts."

me:lah
Some
'e:ng'
'a:ya[']diwine:l
were saying,
whits'iłting'-tł'o:l'
"My bowstring
ło'n
mouse
dahyik'ingya'n-e:-xolung
has chewed up."

Others were saying, "A mouse has chewed up my bowstring."

hayah-mił
And
xoł-ch'itehsde:tł'
they ran after them.
hayah
There
ch'e:'indigit
they ran down.

Others ran after the attacking party.

me'dil*
Canoes
yehxoti'a:n
they ran in.
ta'na:n
Water
xoł ya:łde:wiming'il
they filled with them.
tehwilts'it
Sank
hay
those
me'dil-ne'in
canoes used to be.

When they jumped into their canoes to give chase they filled with water and sank. The mice had gnawed holes in them.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
sahna:nde'n
they went home.
xonchwiwh-dich'e:ch'
Rough-nose
xokil
his brother
na'tehłte:n
took home with him.

Then Rough-nose, carrying his brother, went safely home.

hayah
Here
no:nt'ik'
is the end.