Hupa Online Dictionary and Texts



Dahchwin'-ding Xon'-na:'iswe' (Gooseberry-place Brush Dance)

dahchwin'-ding
Gooseberry-place
xon'-na:'iswe'
brush dance
nahnin
two
k'ehłtsa:n
maidens
ye:w
way up
min'-tsida'
roof
dahno[']ninde:tł'
they sat.

One time they had a Brush dance at Datcwinding. Two young women sat on the roof watching the dance.

haya:ł
And
yehk'iłta:tł'
they began to dance,
nahnin
two
xo'osday
men
do: ya[']xo:łts'it
they did not know.

Two strange men were noticed about the place where the dance was being held.

haya:ł
And
xutł'e'-e:-mił
after midnight
'a:ya[']de:ne'
they said,
xunay
"Friend,
ta:ydinung
let us drink water."

About midnight one of the two girls who were sitting on the roof said to the other, "Xunai, let us get a drink of water."

xa'
"All right,"
ch'ide:ne'
said
hay
łiwung
one of them.

"Very well," said the other.

haya:ł
And
ch'itehsde:tł'
they went
to:-ch'ing'
to the river.
tiwimah
Along the shore
yinuq
south
ch'itehsde:tł'
they went.

They walked along the river-shore toward the spring.

haya:ł
And
xo'osday
men
nahnin
two
no:xo:ning'ung
fell in with them
'ungya'
they saw.
haya:ł
And
yinuq
south
ya[']xotehslay
they took them.

The two strange men overtook them and carried them away toward the south.

ye:w
Way up
no:ta:ng'a:-ding
at No:ta:ng'a:-ding
mił
then
xoning'
their faces
ya:'isloy'
they wrapped
nahxa-le:n
two deer-skins
mił
with.

At Notangading they stopped and wrapped the girls' faces in double deer-skin blankets.

hayah-mił
And
na:yiduq
across - up the hill
yehya[']xolay
they took them.
ye:w
Way up
kiya:neke'*
Kiya:neke'
q'eh
along
na:ya[']xonilay-e:
they took them.

Leaving the river they took them up Ki:yaneke creek.

haya:ł
And
jiyshta:ng'a:-ding
Diyshta:ng'a:-ding
ya[']xowile:l-e:
they took them along.
xahslin-ding
Xahslin-ding creek
q'eh
along
yehya[']xowilay-e:
they took them.
haya:ł
And
q'ut
'a:diwung
for themselves
ya'tehłwis
they were afraid.

When they had crossed Djictangading and Xaslinding creeks, the girls began to fear for their lives.

xokya'
Their dress
tsiq'e'
fringes
ya[']te:mich
they pulled off.
no:ya[']te:me:tł'
They dropped them along.

They pulled off the fringes of their dresses and dropped them by the trail that their friends might know which way they had been taken.

łe:lding
Łe:lding
yima:n
across from
na:ya[']xonilay-e:
they took them.
yisin-ch'ing-ch'ing'
Southfork creek
q'eh
along
yehya[']xowilay
they took them.

At Southfork they were taken across the Trinity river and conducted along Southfork creek.

ya[']te'ichwiw
They cried along.

They cried as they went along.

xwe:ya:lwilil
They camped along.
hayi-tah
Those places
yine[h]ł'ing[']
to see
ya[']xo'iłchwe'
they made them
hay
where
tse:l-nehwa:n
red obsidians
ya:widchway
were buried.
hayi-tah
Those places
k'iłixun
venison
niłtsa:y
dry
ya:silay
was placed.

At the camping places the men showed them where the red obsidians were buried and the dried venison was stored.

mine:jixomił
After a time
ya[']ninde:tł'-e:
they got there.
ła:n
Many
xontah
houses
sa'a:n
were there.
ta:kiwh-tah
Sweat-houses - too
ya:silay
were there.

Finally they came to their journey's end where there were many houses and sweat-houses.

haya:ł
And
q'ut
ch'ide:lts'e'
they lived there.
mine:jixomił
After a time
ya[']k'iwintsit
they pounded acorns.
k'ita:ya[']wiłtsit
They soaked the meal.

After they had been living there some time they went down to the river shore to make acorn soup.

hayah-mił
And
tsumehstł'o:n
a woman
xoch'ing'
to them
ch'e:ya[']ningyay
came
to:-ding
at the river.
ts'isdiyung-xola:n
She was old.

A very old woman came down to see them.

xoch'ing'
To them
ya[']xine:wh
she talked
dining'xine:wh-q'
Hupa language way.
'a[']de:ne'
She said,
whe:
"I
q'ina'
too
whiniwilte:n
was brought here
dahungwho'-dung'
long time ago,
wiwhchwił-dung'
when I was growing.

Speaking to them in the Hupa language she said, "I too was brought here many years ago when I was young.

whimije'e:din[']
My children
whe:
as I
na:tehłkyow
are so big.

Now my children are as large as I am.

q'ut 'e:ng' hayo:w-xw
That is the way
'a:ya'iniw
they always do.

These people are always stealing girls.

k'ina'
Yurok women
-tah
too
ya[']dehłts'e:
live here.

There are Yurok women living here also.

q'ut
wohłdin'-ta:ng'
You will get used to it."

You will get used to it in time."

mine:jixomił
After a time
mije'e:din
babies
ya:'ischwe'n
they had;
kile:xich
boys
nahx
both
xiy
children.

After a while each had a child. Both were boys.

haya:ł
And
xoł-ya[']xowilik
they told them
hay
the
tse:l-nehwa:n
red obsidians
hay
the
wichwa:-tah
they are buried places.
mine:jixomił-'ung'
After a time
xoł-ya[']xowilik
they told them
hay duxwe:di-q'
how
ya[']xo:qot
they stick them
-tah
too.
haya:ł
And
q'ut
xoł-yaydine:wił'a'
they learned.

Their husbands showed them where the red obsidians were buried and taught them to kill deer by magic.

k'iłixun
Deer
k'iningya'n-e:
to feed
ch'e:k'e'iya:wh
always came out
hayah
there
yima:n'ch'ing'
across.

The deer used to come out to feed on the opposite side of the stream.

ya'uqot
They always stuck them.
haya:ł
And
k'e:'idmil-e:
they drop.

When they pointed something at them the deer always fell dead.

haya:ł
And
'a:ya[']de:ne'
they said,
duxwe:di-'e'n
"Why wouldn't it work
na:ya:xosdiqot-de'
if we stuck them?"
haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
said
hay
łiwung
one of them,
xa'
"Very well."

One time they said to each other, "Why wouldn't our husbands die if we did that way with them?"

q'ut
nahsde:tł'
They began to walk
hay
those
mije'e:din
children.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
ła'
one
wilwe:tł'
evening
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
yehch'iwinde:tł'
went in
hay
those
k'idongxwe:*
kitdo:ng-xoi.

One evening after the children had learned to walk the men went into the sweat-house.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
ya[']xohsqot
they stuck them
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
-me'-ch'in'
inside.

The women standing outside did to them as they had been accustomed to do to the deer.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xoch'ing'
to them
ya[']xine:wh
they spoke.
daw
No reply.

They called to them but received no reply.

k'iye:
Again
xoch'ing'
to them
na:ya[']xine:wh
they spoke.
daw
No reply.

Again they called but still they received no reply.

dahungwho'-dung' xowh
Long before
xode:wing'e:tł'
they were dead.

They had already been dead some time.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xolisch
quickly
xehł
loads
wun-na:'isde:tł'
they made ready.
tse:l-nehwa:n
Red obsidian
wha:ne:
only
ya:ya[']k'inge:n
they brought away.
dahna[']xodiwing'a:n
They ran back.

The women packed up their things quickly, taking away only the red obsidians, and started home.

hayi-tah
Those places
xwe:na:ya:lwilil
they camped along
hay
where
dahungwho'
before
xwe:ya:lwilił-tah
they had camped.

They camped each night at the places they had camped before.

hayi-tah
Those places
tse:l-nehwa:n
red obsidian
xa:na:ya[']widchwa:l
they dug up along.

They dug up the red obsidians at these places.

yiwidin-e:-mił-'ung'
Finally
na:'inde:tł'
they got back.
yehna[']widya:-hit
When she went in
ya'wing'e:tł'
they were sitting there.

When they got to their home one of them went into her mother's house. The family were sitting about the fire.

xe'e:ya[']xowidme:tł'*
They had thrown away part of themselves.

They had their hair cut in mourning for the lost daughter.

haya:ł
And
whunchwing
"My mother,"
mił
with
łiwingt'e'n
she addressed her.

"Mother," she said.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a[']de:ne'
said
hay
that
do:k'iwile:
old woman,
i:
"Eh,"
'a[']de:ne'
she said,
dundi-'ung'
"who was that
nichwing'-xw
ill
'a:whiłch'ide:ne'
spoke to me?

"Eh," said the old woman, "who spoke to me in a forbidden manner?

whe:-'e:ng'
I
do:ng'
was that
dunłungwho'-ding
several
me:nundiya:
years ago.

I had a daughter some years ago.

hay
That one
whiwung
from me
k'e:w ch'ixo:łte:n
somebody hid."

They hid her away from me."

haya:ł
And
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
she said to her,
whe:
"I
do:ng'
na:whdiyay
have got back."

"I am that daughter," the young woman said, "I have got back."

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xowa:'iłda:
she handed her
mije'e:din
the child.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
ch'o:nchwit
she took it.

She passed her child to her mother who took it.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
ch'ixowilik
she began to tell them
'aht'ing
everything
hay duxwe:di-q'
how
na:'isde:tł'
they had travelled.

She told her people all that had happened to her since her disappearance.

haya:ł-'ung'
Then
'e'ilwil-mił
when it was night
min't'ah-q'eh
in the woodroom
dinday
flint
michwo:*
its grandmother
de'ine'
he used to imitate
hay
that
kile:xich
boy.

The boy used to imitate the call of flint's grandmother (a bird) in the wood-room at night.

do:-heh
Did not
k'iwinya'n-ya:n-q'i
human-like
'a:niwehst'e'
appear.
xong'
Fire
miky'a:-ch'ing'
away from
dinung
facing
wha:ne:
always
ya'a'a'
he used to sit.

He did not act like a human being and always sat with his back to the fire.

xoh
In vain
ma:lyeh-xw 'a:ya'iliw
they tried to take care of him.

They took care of him the best they could.

yiwidin-e:-mił-'ung'
Finally
xo'ch
quite
kile:xich-kyoh
boy large
sile'n-e:
he became.

He grew to be quite a large boy.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
me:ya[']dzehsla'
they did not like him
me:lah-tah
some of them.

Some of the people did not like him.

mine:jixomił
After a time
tin
trail
na:nde:tł'-e:
they went back.

After a time the two boys went away.

mine:jixomił
For a while
na:na:'indil
they came back.

For a while they used to come back occasionally.

xo'osday
Men
ya[']sile'n
they had become
mił
then
mine:jixomił
after a time
do: na:ya[']ninde:tł'
they did not come back.
hayah
Here
no:nt'ik'
is the end.

When they became men they ceased coming back.