Hupa Online Dictionary and Texts



To:-ding K'e'itł'o' (By the River She Made Baskets)

k'inchiwhi-q'it
At K'inchwiwh-q'it
k'ehłtsa:n
a maiden
ts'isday
lived.
to:-ding
At the river
k'e'itł'o'
she used to make baskets.
łah-xw
Just
xa'a[']t'ing-wint'e:
that she always did.

A young woman, a virgin, who lived at Kintcu:whwhikut used to make baskets by the riverside.

mine:jixomił
After a time
k'iwilkya:n
she was pregnant.

After a time she became pregnant.

k'iwinya'n-ya:n
Man
do: ch'iłtsis
she never saw.
wun xokyung na[:]'iya'
About it her mind went.

She wondered about her condition for she had not even seen a man.

mine:jixomił
After a time
ch'iłtsa:n
she gave birth
t'ehxich
to a girl.
hayah-mił
And
q'ut
ma:lyeh-xw 'a:ch'ilaw
she took care of it.

She gave birth to a girl and took proper care of it.

mine:jixomił
After a time
wingkya:w
she got big.
haya:ł
And
k'iye:
again
na[']k'istł'o'n
she made baskets
to:-ding
at the river.

When the child was quite large the mother made baskets by the river again.

mine:jixomił
After a time
k'iye:
again
k'iwilkya:n
she was pregnant.

She became pregnant a second time.

hayah-mił
And
xo'ji-xw
more
me[']dzehsla'
she hated
hay
that
mije'e:din
baby.
k'iye:
Again
ch'iłtsa:n
she gave birth.
hay
That
mije'e:din
baby
kile:xich
a boy.
haya:ł
And
do: ma:lyeh-xw 'a:ch'ilaw
she did not take care of it.

This time she gave birth to a boy. She hated it and never took care of it.

hayah-mił
And
hay
that
t'ehxich
girl
ma:lyeh-xw 'a:'iliw
always took care of
hay xokil
her brother.

The girl tended her little brother.

mine:jixomił
After a time
xoxung'-xohsle'
she got married.
haya:ł
And
ch'itehsyay
she started.
ch'itehłte:n
She took along
hay
that
t'ehxich
girl.

After a time the mother was to be married and started to her husband's house taking the little girl with her.

hay
The
kile:xich
boy
'e:ng'
it was
xe'e:wiłwa:tł'
she threw away.

yitsin'
Down
dinun-ding
the face of the hill
mił-xoda:k'iłwa:tł'
with she dropped down
xe:q'ay'
basket
me'
in.

She dropped the boy, baby-basket and all, down a steep bank by the trail.

haya:ł
And
'ahłch'ide:ne'
she told,
xa'-e:
"Come along,"
hay t'ehxich
that girl.

"Come along," she said to the girl.

haya:ł
And
daw
"No,"
diwine'
she said.

"No," she said.

winchwiw
She cried.
hay mikil
Her brother
wung
for
winchwiw
she cried.
haya:ł
And
wung
from it
ch'itehsyay
she went.

She cried for her brother but the mother went off and left them both.

haya:ł
And
na[']te:lo:s
she dragged back
hay
the
xe:q'ay'
baby-basket
mining'-q'it-mił
by its bail.
yiwidin-e:-mił
Finally
xa:na:'uslo:s
she dragged it up.
yehna[']wilo:s
She dragged it in.
xontah

The sister, seizing the baby-basket by the bail, dragged it up the hill and back into the house.

hayah-mił
And
wilwe:tł'-mił
when it was night
ch'inehste:ch'
they lay down.
'a[']de:ne'
She said,
hay
that
t'ehxich
girl,
'isdo'
"I wish
yisxun-de'
in the morning
ch'indisit-hit
when we wake up
t'e'
blanket
me' sidite:ch'
in we would be lying,
haya:ł
and
'isdo'
I wish
nohning'-ding
by our heads
sila:
would be lying
hay
that
k'iwidiyun'-te:
we shall eat."

When at night they lay down to sleep the girl said, "I wish when we wake up in the morning we would be lying in a blanket and something to eat would be by our heads."

yisxung-hit
In the morning
ch'e:ya:'insit-hit
when they woke up
t'e'
blanket
me'
in
'ungya'
they saw
ts'iste:ch'
they were lying,
hayah-mił
and
ya:xonin'-ding
ahead of them
ya:suxung
lay
k'iwiyul
food.

When they woke in the morning they found themselves covered with a blanket and food was lying by their heads.

hayah-mił
And
hayah
then
k'iwinya'n
they ate.
łah-xw
Always
xa'a:ya[']t'ing-wint'e:
they did that.

They always did that way.

mine:jixomił
After a time
q'ut
ch'iwingkya:w
got big
hay
that
kile:xich
boy.
mine:jixomił
After a time
'a[']de:ne'
she said,
'isdo'
" I wish,
whikil
my brother,
na:k'idilyay
a string of dentalia
yisxung-de'
to-morrow morning
ch'indisit-hit
when we wake up
nohnin'-ding
at our heads
sila:
would lie."

When the boy became large his sister said, "I wish, my brother, when we wake up tomorrow morning a string of dentalia would lie at our heads."

yisxun-hit
In the morning
ya:xonin'-ding
at their heads
ya:sila:
they lay.

In the morning it was there.

łah-xw wint'e:
Always
xa'a:ya'ne:
they said that
hayah-mił
and
hay
it
miq'eh
afterwards
'e'iliw
happened.

They always made wishes that way and they afterwards came to pass.

mine:jixomił q'ut
After a time
na:'isya'
he began to walk
hay
that
kile:xich
boy.

After a time he began to run about.

hayah-mił
And
'a[']de:ne'
she said,
whikil
"My brother,
'isdo'
I wish
yisxun-de'
to-morrow
ch'indisit-hit
when we wake up
nohnin'-ding
at our heads
ts'iłting'
a bow
sila:
would lie.

One night the sister said, "I wish when we wake up in the morning we would find a bow and arrows at our heads."

haya:ł
And
q'ut
sila:
it lay there.

In the morning there they were.

haya:ł
And
k'iwunay[']da'
to hunt
ch'ite'indil
they travelled.
k'iya:ts
Birds
ch'ise:'iłwe'
he killed.

Then they went hunting and he killed birds.

mine:jixomił
After a time
q'ut
xo'osday
a man
ts'isle'n
he became.
hayah-mił
And
k'iłixun
deer
ch'ise:tehłwe:n
he killed.

Finally he became a man and killed deer.

haya:ł
And
hay
tsumehstł'o:n
woman
ts'isle'n
she became.

The girl was now a woman.

'aht'ing
With everything
xa:'unt'e:
that kind
de:wime'n
was filled
ya:xoxontaw'
their house.

They filled their house with dried meat.

hayah-mił
And
midiłwa:
in turn
dahch'e'ida'
he fished
ło:q'
salmon
wung
for.
ting-'unłung
Many
ch'e'ixa:wh
he used to catch.

Then the boy fished and they dried the fish and stored them away.

k'iye:
Again
hay
that
xa'unt'e:
kind
de:wime'n
was filled with.
haya:ł
And
kin-na:lma:ts'
cribs of hazel
ya:'ischwe'n
they made.

When their house would hold no more they made cribs of hazel.

k'iya:ts
Birds
niłtsa:y
dry
minłung
ten
kin-na:k'iwilma:ts'
cribs
sile'n
there were.
'aht'ing
Everything
xa'unt'e:
that kind
de:wime'n
was filled.

They filled ten of these with provisions.

do: na:ya[:]'iłtsis
They never saw
hay ya:xwunchwing
mother.

All this time they saw nothing of their mother.

mine:jixomił
After a time
k'ina:'isla:l
dreamed
hay
that
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden.

One night the girl had a dream.

yisxung-hit
Next day
xutł'e'-dung'
in the morning
yehna[']widyay
came in
hay
that
q'un-ch'iwichwil
young man.
hayah-mił
And
'a[']de:ne'
he said,
whe:-'e:ng'
"I
hayi-q'
this way
k'inawhlahł
dreamed
tiwima'-tehł
a famine will be."

The next morning, the young man, who now slept in a sweat-house, came in and said, "I dreamed there will be a famine."

haya:ł
And
hay
that
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden
q'ina'
too
'a[']de:ne'
said,
whe:
" I
q'ina'
too
k'inawhlahł
dreamed
hayi-q'
that way."

"I, too, dreamed that," said the sister.

hayah-mił
And
q'ut
tiwima'
there was a famine
dunłungwho'-ding
several
me:nundiyay
years.

For several years there was a famine.

hayah-mił
And
q'ut
no[']te:diqe:t
people began to starve.

The people about began to starve.

mine:jixomił
After a time
xutł'e'-dung'
one morning
min'-t'ah
in the hall
na[']xehsdinah-ts'iw
moving she heard.

One morning the sister thought she heard someone moving outside.

ch'iqa:l
Walking
'ungya'
she found it was.
jo'
"Here,"
ch'ide:ne'
she said,
nikil
"your brother
'o:nchwit
take."

She looked out and saw a woman who said, "Here take your brother."

hayah-mił
And
ch'o:nchwit
she took it.
yehch'iwiłda'
She carried it in.

She took it and carried it in.

haya:ł
And
k'iye:
again
ła'
one
yehch'iwiłda'
she carried in.
yiwidin-e:-mił
Finally
minłung
ten
yehwingyay
came in
hay
those
xomije'e:din'
her children.
hayi-q'
That
'unłung
many
xola:n
there were.
haya:ł
And
ch'o:nahłts'it
she knew
xwunchwing
her mother
hay
that
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden.

Then she took in another and another until she had taken in ten children which had been born to her mother.

haya:ł
And
na:miq'eh-ding
last of all
yehch'iwinyay
came in
hay xoxung'
husband.

Last of all the husband came in.

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
said
hay
that
tsumehstł'o:n
woman,
na:'ndiyay
"They came back.
no[']te:diqeh-tehł
They were about to starve,
hayo:w
those
nikilxay
your brothers."

"I have come back," said the mother, "these your brothers were about to starve."

haya:ł
And
'a:ch'ondehsne'
she thought,
'e:wa:k
"Poor things,
ma:k'iwhkit
I better feed them
xolisch
quick.

"Poor things," thought the girl, "I had better hurry and feed them."

haya:ł
And
ma[']k'iłkit
she fed the little one.
'aht'ing
"All
xolisch
quick
ky'ohyung
eat,"
ch'ide:ne'
she said.

She fed the smallest one and told the others to eat as fast as they could.

ch'inilgit
She was afraid of
hay
that
q'ung-ch'iwichwil
young man.

She was afraid of the young man, her brother.

wilwe:tł'-mił
At night
na:'ndiyay
he came back.
yehk'inge:n
He brought in
k'iłixun
a deer.

When he came back at night he brought in a deer.

haya:ł
And
'a[']de:ne'
she said,
hay
that
tsumehstł'o:n
woman,"
ts'ehdiyah
I am glad
whiwhxiy'
my boy
k'e:yun'-te:
I am going to eat."

"I am glad my boy," said the woman, "for I am going to eat."

hay-'ung'
Then
do: ch'ixonehł'e'n
he did not look at her.
ch'e:na[']indiyay
He went back out.

He did not even look at her, but turned around and went out.

'a:dixing
Fasting
yisxung-hit
the next day
wilwe:tł'
until night
ta:kiwh
sweat-house
me'
in
ts'isda:-xw
he stayed.

All the next day he stayed in the sweat-house without food.

haya:ł
And
k'iye:
again
wilwe:tł'-mił
at night
'a[']de:ne'
said
hay
that
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden,
yehnunda:wh
"Come in
na:k'ingyung
eat again."

The following evening the girl went to the sweat-house entrance and said, "Come and eat."

haya:ł
And
daw
"No,"
ch'ide:ne'
he said.
diywho'
"Things
łe:na:k'ilah-ne'
gather together.

"No," he said, "gather up your things.

q'a:de'
Pretty soon
hayo:w
this
nohxontaw'
our house
me:w
under
na[']k'isqot-te:
he is going to poke.
nohxa:
After us
ch'iningyay
has come
hay nohta'
our father.
hay-de:
That is the one
ma:lyeh-xw 'a:nohch'e'iliw
always took care of us."

I have found our father; he has come for us. Soon he will push a stick under our house."

haya:ł
And
yehna[']widyay
she went in
hay
the
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden.
hayah-mił
And
ta[']k'ime:tł'
she made soup.
ła:n
Much
xwa:ya[']k'iłkit
she fed them.

The girl went back to the house and made a quantity of soup that they might all have plenty to eat.

hayah-mił
And
k'iwinya'n
acorns
-tah
beside
na[']ditehłwa:tł'
she emptied down.
ło:q'
Salmon
-tah
too
ch'ite:chway
she buried in several places.

When the rest were asleep she emptied down some acorns and buried some salmon under the earthen floor.

xutł'e'-e:-mił
At midnight
me:w
under
na[']k'isqot
he poked.
teh-ch'ing'
Under the water
wing'a'
went
hay
the
xontah
house,
hay
the
ta:kiwh
sweat-house
q'ina'
too.

At midnight the father pushed a stick under both the house and sweat-house and they went of their own accord under the water.* There their father, a water sprite,** lived.

yisxung-hit
Next morning
ch'e:ya'insit-hit
when they woke up
xontah
house
'e:ding
without
'ungya'
they saw
ya:'iste:ch'
they lay.

The next morning when the others woke up they saw they were lying without a house to cover them.

hayah-mił
And
ch'ite:ng'e'n
looked about
hay tsumehstł'o:n
the woman.
diywhe'eh
Nothing
do: na:silq'a:s
was left.

The woman looked about but saw nothing left.

haya:ł
And
xa[']k'iwingwhe'
she began to dig
min'-t'ah
in the hall.
hayah
There
'ungya'
she saw
ło:q'
salmon
wichwa:
buried,
k'iwingya'n
acorns
'ungya'
she saw
q'ina'
too
na:ya:diwilwa:tł'
were lying there.

Then she began to dig in the wood-room where she found acorns and salmon buried.

hay
That
k'ehłtsa:n
maiden
'a:t'e:n
did it.

She knew her daughter had done that for her.

hayah
Here
no:nt'ik'
is the end.