Hupa Online Dictionary and Texts



Origin of Fire*
*Told at Hupa, July 1902, by McCann to offset a story by a Redwood Indian which tells of the stealing of fire.

yima:ni-k'iwingxoya:n
Across the ocean old man
'e:ng'
it was
tse:
stones
ya[']wing'a:n
picked up.
hay-'ung'
Then
na[']niłtse:tł'
he hit them
'iłch'ing'
on each other.

It was the Old-man-across-the-ocean. He picked up stones and struck them together.

daw
Nothing
'ungya'
he saw.

Nothing happened.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ayliwh
willow
miqude'
its root
ya[']winta:n
he picked up.
no[']ninga:s
He whittled it down
niłtsa:y
dry.

Then he picked up a willow root and whittled it down to the dry part.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
yehk'iłwis
he bored a hole.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
dahna[']diwił'a'
he set another on it.
haya:ł-'ung'
And
ch'idiwiłwis
he rolled it between his hands.

He bored holes in it and then setting another stick in one of the holes, rolled it between his hands.

sa:k'iding
He was surprised
'ungya'
to see
łit
smoke
na:diwing'a'
come out.

He was surprised to see smoke come out.

mine:jixomił
After a time
'ungya'
he saw
xong'
fire
ch'e:nima:s
rolled out.

Soon fire rolled out.

hayi-q'-'ung'
That is the way
'ahdiyaw
it happened.

That was the way it happened.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
de:d
now
xa:t'
still
'a:ya'ił'e:n-e:
they do that.

They do that way now.