Hupa Online Dictionary and Texts



The Scabby Young Man*
*Told at Hupa, December 1901, by McCann.

k'inchiwhi-q'it
At Kintcu:whwhikut
k'ixinay
Kiixunai
ch'itehłchwe:n
one after the other grew
minłun-ding
ten,
ła'
one
tsumehstł'o:n
woman.

At Kintcu:whwhikut there grew ten Kiixunai and one woman.

hay-'ung'
And
na:na:tuł-ding
stepping down place
miyeh
under
ch'e'ite'
he used to lie.
hay-'ung'
And
chwung'
dirt
mił
with
xowung
over him
na:ya'de'itul
they used to drag their feet.

One of the brothers who was covered with scabs lay next to the steps in the sweat-house where the others stepped over him with their dirty feet.

hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
after a time
'a:xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he told him,
na:tse:s
"Arrows
miloy'-ne'
you must feather,"
xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he told him.

Once the head-man of the family commanded him to feather arrow-shafts.

digyung
"Here
nohoł
from us
yinuqi-yima:n
south across
'e:na:ng
it is
k'iłdik'-kyoh
woodpecker
yaykiwilt'a:ts'
blanket of strips
siłkyo:s
lies
me'
in something.

"Here across the river toward the south hangs a blanket made of woodpecker scalps in rows," he said.

ch'idilye:
Dance
mine:jit
middle
me'
in
che'iye'n
he always stands.

"The man who stands in the middle of the dance always wears that blanket."

hay-'ung'
"And
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
he told him,
xa'
"Come,
we:dił
we will go."

"Very well, let us go," said the brother who was covered with scabs.

haya:-ch'ing'
There
minłung
ten
-xw
places
mich'ing'ah
near it
ts'iste:ch'
they lay.
niłne:jit
A little way from each other
minłung
ten
-xw
places
ts'iste:ch'
they lay.

They found ten men lying there a little way from each other.

hay
The
xo'ch
very
mine:jit
middle
na:nahłtsis
it hung.

Right in the middle was hanging the blanket.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
na:na'wiłkyo:s
he took it down,
hayo:w
that
t'e'
blanket.
xotis
Over them
no:na:ya'diwita:l
he stepped.

The scabby brother stepping over them took the blanket down.

hayah-mił-ung'
And
hay-ye:w
that distant one
min'day'-ch'in'-ding
outside
ts'iste:n
he lay
ch'ixondehsne'
found him out.

The man lying on the outside first discovered what had hapened.

t'e'
"Blanket
nohwung
from us
dahch'idiwiłkyo:s
he has taken away,"
ch'ide:ne'
he said.

"He has taken the blanket away from us," he cried.

xola'-me'
His hand in
sila:
lies
hayo:w
that
na:tse:s
arrow.

Then the scabby one in whose hand lies the arrow threw himself with it.

hayah-mił-ung'
And then
'a:dił-ya:na'k'iłqoch
he threw it with himself
me'dilding
Medilding
yinuqi-yima:n
south across
na:na:diwing'a'
it stood up.

The arrow came down on the west side of the Trinity river south of Medildin.

hayah
There
no'xo:'awhil
they kept arriving
hay
those
xoł ch'iwidil
following him.

Those who were pursuing him came there.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
hay
that
ya:na'k'iłqoch'
he threw again.

He threw himself with it again.

tse:mit'ah
Tsemita
na:na:diwing'a'-e:
it stood up.

This time it came down at Tsemita.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
'a:dił-ya:na'k'iłqoch
he threw it with himself again.
hijit
Then
misq'it
Miskut
yima:nch'ing'
across from
na:na:diwing'a'
it stood up.

Again he threw it landing opposite Miskut.

hay
That
ya:na'k'iłqoch'
he threw.
q'ay'-no:ng'a:-ding
Kaino:ngading
na:na:diwing'a'-e:
it stood up.

From there he threw himself with it to Kainonadin.

hay
That
ya:na'k'iłqoch'
he threw again
yinuq
south.
na:na:diwing'a'-e:
It stood up,
'ehs-ch'ing'
Estcing.

Then he threw the arrow with himself back to Estcin.

haya:ł
And
xoyeh
behind him
ch'ite:dimil
they fell one after an other.

Those who were following him fell behind.

haya:ł
And
hay
that
ya:na'k'iłqoch'
he threw again.
tse:yeh-ding
Tseyeding
na:na:diwing'a'-e:
it stood up.

He threw it again coming down at Tseyedin.

hay
That
ya:na'k'iłqoch'
he threw again.
niłtuqi-lay
NiLtukalai
na:na:diwing'a'-e:
it stood up.

The next time he threw it landed with him at NiLtukalai.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
yida(h)-xo-mingwah-ch'ing'
Yiidaxo:mingwatcing
łah-xw
without reason
'a:ch'ilaw
he did it.

Then without special reason he threw it to Yidaxominwatcin.

haya:ł
And
q'ut
dahch'idiwiłkyo:s
he took it away.
ła'ay
The one
ch'iwiłkyo:sił
taking it along
ła'ay-xw
really
je:lo'
djelo:
me'
in
no'niłkyo:s
he put it.

Having succeeded in taking away the blanket he put it into a storage basket.

hay-'ung'
And
mine:jixomił
after a time
xowung
to him
no:na:wh ninde:tł'
to marry came
nahnin
two
yiduqa-to:-no:ng'a:-ding
eastern water
de:-mił
from.

After a time two maidens came to marry him from the shore of the eastern world.

hay-'ung'
And
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
she said to him,
niwung
"To you
no:na:wh ninde:tł'
they came to marry."
hay
xołtishch'e'
His younger sister
'a:yxo:łne'
kept telling him.

"They have come to marry you," said the sister to the scabby brother.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xwa:
for him
ta'k'ime:tł'
they made soup
nahdiyaw
dentalia
mitsing'
its meat.

The stranger women made soup for them of dentalia meat.

ła'ay-xw
Really
ch'inehłya:n-e:
he ate it up,
hayo:w
that
łoh-kyahtse:
scabs
wha:ne:
only.

The scabby brother was the only one who could eat it.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
xoł ya'tehsyay
with them he went
hayo:w
that one.
na'tehsde:tł'
They went back.
yo:w
That
k'inchiwhi-q'it
Kintcu:whwhikut
diq'a:n
ridge
yiduq
up
me:na:ya:'isde:tł'
they started back.

Then he went with them along the ridge from Kintcu:whwhikut toward the east.

hijit-ung'
Then
'a'de:ne'
she said,
yo:w
"That
milay'
on top
xe'e:diwa:tł'-e:
disappears over the hill
mił
then
'a:yninsin-ne'
you must think
yiduqa-to:-no:ng'a:-ding
eastern water's edge
yima:nch'ing'
across
xolung ch'e'ningya:
he must have arrived."

Before they left one of the women told his sister that when the feathers on his head-dress disappeared behind the crest of the mountain she might know he had reached the eastern world.

ch'e'ninde:tł'-hit
When they got there
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
she told him,
xo'dzi-nehwa:n
"Carefully
ye'intuł-ne'
you must step in
hay
that
me'dil
canoe.

When they came to the shore of the body of water which separates the eastern world from this, one of his wives cautioned him to step into the canoe with care.

to:-nehwa:n*
Black obsidian
me'dil
canoe
'e:ng'
it is
hay
that
yehwidqeh-te:
will come."

The canoe, which had come to ferry them across, was made of black obsidian, on which ordinarily one would slip and hurt himself.

hay-'ung'
And
'unt'e:
many
na'wa:
were there
hay
who
k'ita:łts'it-xosin
were soaking acorns.
q'osta:n
Hats
łiqay
white
łah-xw
just
no:ninłiq'-nehwa:n
dough put on the ground like.

So many woman were making soup by the water's edge that the ground was white with their hats, as if dough had been spread over it.

hay-'ung'
And
xowung
at him
ło'-xowinse'n
they laughed.

The women laughed at him as he walked along.

hayo:w
That one
'a:'int'e'
how he appeared
ch'iqa:l
he walked
ch'e:wehł
carrying
hay
xotehł-na'we
his quiver.
'unt'e: ye:
How it looked
na:xowiloy'
his belt.

His quiver looked as badly as he.

na:yew-xw-mił
From here and there a long way
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
one said to him,
whiwunda:n
"My son-in-law."

When he was yet a long way off he heard someone calling him son-in-law.

na:yew-xw-mił
From here and there a long way
k'iye:
again
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
one said to him,
whiwunda:n
"My son-in-law."
minłung-xoh-mił
Ten places from
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
one said to him,
whiwunda:ne'
"My son-in-law."

He heard himself called that way ten times.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
xontah
house
yehch'iwinyay
he went in,
hijit
then
q'ut
ta:ya'k'ime:tł'
they made soup.
hijit-ung'
Then
minłung
ten
me'
in
xoch'ing'
to him
yehch'iwingxa:n
she brought in
hay
that
sa'xa:wh
soup.

When he came to the house of his wives he went in. They made soup and brought him ten baskets full.

hay-'ung'
Then
'aht'ing
all
me'
in
ch'inehłya:n
he ate up.

He ate it all.

ye:
"Ye!"
ya:ch'ondehsne'
they thought,
q'ut
xolun-tehł
"he will be the one."

"Ye! he will be the one," they thought.

hayahujit-'ung'
And when
no'k'iningya'n
he finished,
hijit
then
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
yehch'iwingyay
he went in.

When the meal was over the men went into the sweat-house.

xoł-no'k'inilit
He finished sweating
hijit-ung'
then
na'wime'
he swam.

After the scabby one had finished sweating he went out to swim.

hijit
Then
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
he said to him,
do:-xolin-tah
"No place
'e:ng'
it is
xoling
there is
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweathouse wood.

Then someone said to him, "You can't find sweat-house wood around here.

digyung
Here
nohoł
from us
yide'-yiduq
northeast
wha:ne:
only
'unt'e:
there is
ta:ysts'e:y'
sweat-house wood.

Northeast from here is the only sweat-house wood."

xoninsohch
Mink
'a:n'
said it.

It was Mink who told him this.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
ch'itehsde:tł'
they started
mixa:
after it.

Then they two went there after it.

hayah
There
ch'ininde:tł'
they arrived.

hijit-ung'
Then
ch'iwiłk'il
he split with his hands
hayo:w
that
k'inehst'a:n
Tan oak.

The scabby one took a Tan oak and split it to its roots with his hands.

ła'ay-xw
Really
mixa:ch'e'-ch'ing'
to the root
no:ndik'il-e:
that far he split it.
hayahujit
And then
ya:na:'isk'il
he split it up.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
minłung
ten
ts'isloy'
bundles he tied.

Then he split it up and made ten bundles of it.

hijit
Then
q'ut
na'tehsde:tł'
they went home.
chwola'
Five
wiloy'
bundles
xong
himself
ya'winge:n
He carried.
yo:w
That one
q'ing'
too,
chwola'
five
wiloy'
bundles
ya'winge:n
carried,
xoninsohch
Mink.

They went back each carrying five bundles.

xontah-ding
Village
miwah-ch
near
hijit
then
'aht'ing
all
łe:na:'isloy'
he tied together.
hijit-ung'
Then
xoq'it
on him
dahch'iwing'a:n
he placed it.

When they were near the village they put the wood down. Having tied them all together, Mink lifted them all onto the back of the scabby man.

hijit
Then
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
he told him,
xo'dzi-nehwa:n
"Carefully
no:ng'awh-ne'
you must put it down
hay
the
nime:tł'-ding
you bring place."

"Put them down carefully wherever you take them," he said.

hayahujit-'ung'
Then
q'ut
xote:lit
he smoked himself.

Then the scabby fellow smoked himself.

hijit-ung'
Then
no'nilit-hit
when he finished sweating
to:-ch'ing'
at the river
na'wime'
he swam.

When he was through he went to the river to swim.

ła'ay-xw
Really
ye:w
way
yide'
down
xa:ngxe:n-e:
he came up.

He came to the surface of the water way down stream.

hay
His
xwe:da'ay
hair
xwe:di-kya' 'unt'e:
how it looked!

How beautiful his hair looked!

hay
Those
k'ita:łts'it-xosin
soaking acorns
łah-xw
just
noyniłkit-nehwa:n
like fog it appeared.

There were so many women making soup by the riverside that the steam of the cooking settled over the place like a fog.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a'de:ne'
one said,
k'inchiwhi-q'it
"Kintcu:whhwikut
mił
from
'ut-t'e:n
he married
ch'itehslah
is drowning.

One of the woman said, "That fellow who came here from Kintcu:whwhikut and married is drowned."

nixung'
Your husband
tehslah
is drowning,"
xoł-ch'ide:ne'
she told her,
hayo:w
that one.

"Your husband is drowned," she told one of the wives.

hay-'ung'
And
xa:na:'usdiya:-hit
when he came up
na'xotehłchwo:gy
he swept
ta:kiwh
sweathouse
me:q'
inside.

When he had come up from the river, now no longer scabby, he swept the sweat-house.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
'a:xołch'ide:ne'
he said to him,
xa'
"Come,
xontah
house
yehna:ydił
let us go in.

"Come," said Mink to him, "let us go into the house.

yisxun-de'
Tomorrow
'e:ng'
it is
k'itiquch-te:
shinny will be played
whiq'e:y
my brother-in-law,"
xoł-ch'ide:ne'
he told him.

Tomorrow there will be shinny-playing."

q'ut
ya'k'iwingya'n
They ate.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
yisxun-hit
next day
q'ut
ch'ixotehłte:n
he took him along.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
mił-k'itiquch
shinny stick
xola'
his hand
me'
in
no'ninta:n
he put.

The next day Mink took the stranger along to the game and handed him a shinny stick.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
niłq'eh-niłchwit
toward the ground he pressed.
ła'ay-xw
Really
sigya:s-e:
it broke.

When the one who had been scabby pressed down on it to test it, it broke.

k'iye:
Again
na:ła'
another
xowa:'inta:n
he gave him.
k'iye:
Again
hay
the
xa'a:ch'ilaw
same thing he did.
ła'ay-xw
Really
sigya:s-e:
it broke
k'iye:
again.

Mink gave him another which broke also.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
'a'de:ne'
he said,
q'ut
xa'
"Well,
xa:t'i-heh
let it go."
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
xokya:ng'ay-q'eh
his arm
xa'winta:n
he drew from
mił-k'itiquch
shinny stick
tse:-łitsow
blue-stone.

"Well, let it go," said the guest and drew from his arm a shinny stick of blue-stone.

'e:ng'
"It is
nich'ing'ah
before you
ya:duqay
wall stick up
ch'ischwin'-te:
he will make,"
xoch'ide:ne'
he told him.

"They will make a wall come between you and the goal," his companion told him.

hay-'ung'
Then
hay
that
yiwundimil-e:
went through.

He sent the balls right through the wall.

wilwe:tł'-e:
Until night
xa'a:ya[']xoł'ing-xw
they did that with him.

They played until night.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
q'ut
na'ne:wehsdilay
he won.
hijit
Then
q'ut
na:ya'tehsde:tł'
they went home.

Having won, Mink and the man from Kintcu:whwikut went home.

hayahujit
And
q'ut
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
ts'isda:-te:
"He will stay,"
hayo:w
that one.

"He will stay here," thought the father of the wives.

hijit-ung'
And then
yisxung-hit
next day
'a:ch'ondehsne'
he thought,
xowung
"To them
na:te:sdiya:-te:
I will go back."
hay
The
minłung
ten
xołing
his brothers
hayo:w
that one
xołtishch'e'
his sister
q'ina'
too.

The next day the one who had been scabby concluded to return to his brothers and sister.

hayahujit-'ung'
And then
na:tehsdiyay
he went home.
na:'ndiyay-e:
He got back to
k'inchiwhi-q'it
Kintcu:whwhikut
hayo:w
his
xołing
brothers
wung
to.
hayahujit-'ung'
And then
hay
his
xołtishch'e'
sister
'ahłch'ide:ne'
he told,
yiduqa-to:-no:ng'a:-ding
"To the eastern water's edge
te:se:tł'-te:
we will go."

When he got back to Kintcu:whwhikut he said to his sister, "Let us go to the eastern world."

hayo:w
Those
xołing
his brothers
'e:ng'
it was
me:w-na:sita:n
meu:nasitan*
łah
once
wha:ne:
only
mił
with
xwe:k'ine'
went around.

He gave to each of his brothers a woodpecker head-dress.

haya:ł-'ung'
And
q'ut
ch'itehsde:tł'
they two went.

The brother and the sister went away.

de:t
Now
na[']dil-e:
they are
haya:-ch'ing'
there.

They are there now.

hay
This
'e:ng'
is
xoch'idilye'
his dance,
hay-de:t
this
hun'i-q'eh
river along
ch'idilye:
dance.

This along-the-river-dance is his.

k'iwinya'n-ya:n-tah-ding
"In the Indian world
xa'a[']k'ił'in-te:
that way they will do,"
ch'ide:ne'
he said.

"In the Indian world they will do this way," he said.

ła'
"One
tsumehstł'o:n
woman,
łiwung
one of them
q'ina'
too
xo'osday
a man will be
hay
who
ch'ixowiłchwe:lił-te:
will fix the dance place.

"There will be one man and one woman who will fix the dancing place.

whe:
My
whinist'e'
body
hay
xokyung
his mind
minya:-te:
will come to
hay
who
xa'a'k'iwilehł-te:
will do that."

My body will come to the mind of the man who will do that."